Reviews

Pink Floyd The Wall

Pink Floyd The Wall

by Ric Albano

Today we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall with a Classic Movie Review of the 1982 motion picture Pink Floyd The Wall. Today’s article is done in conjunction with The River of Rock, and is published in along with an album review of The Wall 1979 album on Classic Rock Review and of the 1990 Roger Waters The Wall Live in Berlin concert review on Kid’s Theatre News.

Pink Floyd The Wall may be the last of the classic rock operas that were translated to full-length films. This area had previously been dominated by The Who, with Tommy and Quadrophenia each later becoming full-length films. But in many ways, Pink Floyd The Wall is superior to those films, especially when it comes to artistic sensibility and cinematography. Directed by Alan Parker, the film premiered during the summer of 1982, about 32 months after the 1979 Pink Floyd album on which it was based. Like most of the tracks on that album, the screenplay was written by vocalist and bassist, Roger Waters, and combines live action scenes along with animation by Gerald Scarfe, all set to the concept music that tells the internalized story.

Old Pink, Young PinkThe plot centers around a single character, a rock star named Pink (which undoubtedly comes from the band’s actual record signing when a clueless executive asked, “by the way, which one’s Pink?”). The adult version of this character is played by Boomtown Rats frontman Bob Geldof, who starts the film alone in a catatonic trance in a hotel room. The first half of the film, which corresponds with the first record of The Wall double album, involves flashbacks from both the distant and recent past interspersed by fantasy sequences involving war, death, and rebellion. Here, we also learn of the situations and relationships which contributed to Pink’s internal building of an emotional “wall”.

When Pink was an infant, his British soldier father (James Laurenson) was killed in World War II. As a young child, Pink is constantly searching for a father figure, while his overbearing mother (Christine Hargreaves) doesn’t appreciate his need for a male presence. As he grows, the young Pink (played by Kevin McKeon) causes minor pranks, is constantly curious, and starts experimenting with drugs. Meanwhile, the cruel schoolmaster (Alex McAvoy), ridicules Pink for writing poems in class by mockingly reading the words of the actual Pink Floyd song “Money” in front of the class.

Marching HammersAs an adult, Pink is in a failing marriage and discovers his wife (Eleanor David) is having an affair while he’s on tour and he is growing ever dissatisfied with the rock and roll lifestyle. After bringing a female groupie back to his hotel room, Pink has a violent breakdown and trashes the hotel room. Later when alone, he displays bizarre behavior by arranging the broken pieces of objects in the trashed room and shaving his body hair and eyebrows, all while the flashbacks and fantasies continue.

When Pink is later “rescued” by his manager (Bob Hoskins) and brought to the arena, his mental disdain for the audience internally turns him into a fascist dictator with the audience carrying out terror on the world before his internal struggles finally cause him to yell “Stop” and conduct an internal trial that leads to the “tearing down” of the Wall.

Musically, there is a surprising amount of real difference between the 1979 album and the 1982 movie. Two new songs are included in the film, including with the opener “When Tigers Broke Free” and the song “What Shall We Do Now?”, which was intended for the original album but cut because of time constraints. Conversely, two songs from the album, “Hey You” and “The Show Must Go On’, were omitted. While the rest of the songs pretty much run in sequence, most of those were either remixed for the movie or re-recorded all together. From this latter group are the two “In the Flesh” tracks and “Stop”, each of which feature lead vocals by Geldof, and newly recorded versions of “Mother”, “Is There Anybody Out There?”, “Bring the Boys Back Home”, and “Outside the Wall”.

Union Jack To Grave CrossVisual highlights from song sequences are led by the animation during “Goodbye Blue Sky”, “What Shall We Do Now?”, “Waiting for the Worms” and “The Trial”. On these, the morphing is graceful and seamless with completely original concepts like flowers copulating and then battling, a living and expanding wall, the Union Jack morphing into a blood-drenched grave cross, hammer pairs marching in lockstep across the land, and the various characters from Pink’s past as exaggerated animations. Of the live action sequences, the best are “Another Brick In the Wall, Part II” (which was released as an MTV video prior to the movie’s opening), “Young Lust”, “One of My Turns”, Comfortably Numb”, and “Run Like Hell”.

While the 90 minute film contains very little actual dialogue, Geldof does a fine job of portraying the differing emotions and mental states in flashback, fantasy, and reality. The much more limited supporting cast also makes the most of their short appearances by playing to their perceived stereotypes. The only real flaws in the film are a few really out of place scenes and the excess use of time-shifting, which can easily lose a less-than attentive audience. On the flip side, there is so much to unwrap in these scenes, that even one who has viewed the film several times over several decades (as I have) can discover something new with each viewing.

Roger Waters on SetOriginally, the film was intended to be live footage from the album’s tour, along with Scarfe’s animation and some extra scenes, making it much like Led Zeppelin’s The Song Remains the Same. Parker, a Pink Floyd fan, approached Waters with his own idea and thus began this interesting project. Similarly, a soundtrack album was listed in the film’s end credits, but only a single containing “When the Tigers Broke Free” and the rerecorded “Bring the Boys Back Home” has officially been released to date.

After it was widely released, Pink Floyd The Wall rose to #3 at the box office, just below the blockbusters E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and An Officer and a Gentleman. Although the film received generally positive reviews, both Waters and Parker have expressed reservations about the film. Pink Floyd guitarist, David Gilmour, has stated that the conflict between he and Waters which ultimately broke up the classic version of Pink Floyd, started during the film’s production. In the final scene, during the song “Outside the Wall”, children are shown cleaning up after a destructive battle with Pink’s ultimate fate never being revealed. In a way, this reflects the varied opinions on Pink Floyd The Wall over the past thirty years.

~

Classic Movie Review is a monthly series on Big Blue Bullfrog, which explores quality movies and films that are more than 20 years old, and is done in conjunction with the River of Rock. Owned and operated by 33 Dimensions LLC, River of Rock is a network of music and entertainment websites. For more information or interest in submitting a review, please contact ric@modernrockreview.com.

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Aliens (with Beer)

Aliens (with Beer)

by J.D. Cook

It’s been ages since I’ve reviewed a live event but I just felt compelled to spread the word about my recent trip to a local theater. It’s called the Midtown Cinema and it’s located on Riley Street in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. As part of downtown Harrisburg’s 3rd in the Burg festival the theater showed the science fiction classic Aliens. As a huge fan of the film I could not resist seeing it on the big screen for the first time, since I hadn’t been born when it was originally released. There was one extra bonus that put the icing on this proverbial cake, the event was BYOB! So I got to toss back a six pack whilst enjoying the film.

Minor Spoilers Below

For those of you who haven’t seen Aliens there are a lot reasons it’s great. The first film, Alien, was a pure horror film set in a claustrophobic ship. In it the lone Alien stalked and killed all of the crew except Ellen Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) who managed to survive, escape and jettison the creature into space. This time around there are multiple Aliens and they have overrun a local colony. Enter some Colonial Marines, a slimy corporate type; an Android and a returning Ripley who agrees to accompany the team as a consultant. When the protagonist of a horror franchise returns in a sequel it’s almost always framed by the character facing their fear. Horror films can be reminiscent of our own childhoods in this way because as children we are often told that the only way to defeat our fear is to face it. Ripley does just that in this film as she is the most capable character. She never underestimates the threat and acts with the most awareness of her situation. She’s a stark contrast to Bill Paxton’s amazingly terrified Hudson whose most famous line is “Game Over Man! GAME OVER”.

The major theme of this film is motherhood. Ripley becomes a surrogate mother for the only survivor of the colony, a traumatized girl who calls herself Newt (Carrie Henn). They connect as they are the only two who have previously survived encounters with the Aliens. In her quest to save Newt, Ripley comes face to face with another mother, the Alien Queen. Ripley uses the threat of destroying the Queens’s eggs to allow her and Newt to escape but then attempts to obtain a little violent catharsis by destroying the eggs, the queen and any aliens that get in her way. Unfortunately this leads to the Alien Queen seeking vengeance on Ripley leading to the ultimate Mother confrontation. It’s been over 20 years since audiences first saw Ripley confront the Queen with the battle cry of, “Get Away from Her You Bitch,” but it still brought cheers!

After the film was over the crowd disbursed into the night but we had all shared a great experience as many of us saw it for the first time on the silver screen while others got to re-live an amazing film from their childhood. Hopefully Midtown Cinema’s will be doing some more science fiction or horror classics in the coming months as Friday Night’s event was packed with people. There’s nothing quite as awesome as getting a good buzz whilst watching one of your favorite films surrounded by an audience that is just as enthusiastic about it as you!

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Agents of Shield: The Well

Agents of Shield: The Well

by J.D. Cook

Sorry folks. I was hit by an Asgardian cold recently and I barely made it through Agents of Shield or my Wednesday. Thankfully I woke up today feeling great with tons of memories of my time recuperating in Tahiti, “It’s a magical place”.

Oh well back to work on ‘Thor’s Day’. Fitting that the episode I’m discussing actually tied into Thor: The Dark World. At first I felt like this episode was a bit slow and silly. I mean why did all of the people in Norway speak English as their first language to each other? Why didn’t Thor, Iron Man, Captain America, the Hulk, Hawkeye or Black Widow respond when the mystical Asgardian staff was giving bad people super powers they were using to reap destruction through whole towns? I mean the news was reporting on it. Surely someone could have told any of those superheroes to step in. All of those complaints aside I wasn’t feeling well at all whilst watching it so maybe my mind wasn’t quite connecting all the dots. It was funny that the Agents of Shield started the episode cleaning up after Thor’s destruction in his film.

Now the episode did get immediately better after it was revealed that Dr. Elliot Randolph (Peter Macnicol) was not actually a Professor on Norse legends but in fact a part of them. He was an Asgardian who came down long ago and decided to live on Earth in peace after his years of fighting ended. It’s an interesting parallel to Thor as he is currently doing something similar. As far as character development went in this episode we got to see a bit of Ward’s (Brett Dalton) back story and that Melinda May (Ming-Na Wen) is really in charge of her own dark past. If you didn’t watch the episode the mystical Asgardian staff gives you super powers at the cost of forcing you to relive and dwell on your worst memories. Ward used it and was a mess. May used it and was fine. Although I’m not sure how you can’t be a mess when you basically drowned your brother in a well as a young boy. Don’t know what May’s darkness is but it can’t beat that can it? Well we do know she can sleep with it at the very least. Can I get a sick burn high five?! (puts hand up in eager waiting)

A. (puts hand down with a sad look on his face since you didn’t high five him)

B. (puts hand down and looks at you funny for high fiving your computer screen)

In the final scene we got to see Coulson’s (Clark Gregg) dream of his time in Tahiti where his masseuse told him it was a magical place. He woke up shocked but I’m not really sure why. I mean the audience assumes he’s realizing he’s been repeating what he heard there for months but wouldn’t it comfort him to have an actual memory of being there? If anything that makes things less suspicious. Next week the team returns to being…you guessed it…trapped on the plane. There have been far too many episodes set in this location and I hate it and never want to see it again. That’s all.

Catch up with the Show on ABC. Com or Hulu!

Other Episodes of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Agents of Shield: Pilot
Agents of Shield: 0-8-4
Agents of Shield: The Asset
Agents of Shield: Eye Spy
Agents of Shield: The Girl in the Flower Dress
Agents of Shield: F.Z.Z.T.
Agents of Shield: The Hub

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Laying the Hammer Down on ‘Thor’s Day’
Boycott X-Men Days of Future Past
Superior Spider-Man
Top 7 Venom Story Arc Countdown
The Avengers Age of Ultron Preview

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Laying the Hammer Down on ‘Thor’s Day’

Laying the Hammer Down on ‘Thor’s Day’

by J.D. Cook

I was not really hyped up for Thor: The Dark World. I mean I certainly wasn’t going to miss it but much like the first Thor I didn’t quite know what to expect. The previews were pretty lite on the details side. They essentially just told us Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and Thor (Chris Hemsworth) would team up. I certainly wasn’t expecting the emotional depth of feeling that occurred early in the film or the amazing cameo midway through and I certainly did not see the ending coming. If you haven’t seen the film yet and do not want the plot spoiled I will simply say it was well worth the price of admission and extremely funny.

Still here? Ok let’s jump into the minute details other sites won’t touch! The first Thor is probably my favorite Marvel movie behind the Avengers which is, of course, in some other league of films. I mean I love Iron Man and have always been a bigger fan of his going back to reading Warren Ellis’s run on Extremis but something about the first Thor just worked so brilliantly. I think it was the heart that Kenneth Branagh injected into what could have easily devolved into a special effects extravaganza. Instead it stayed grounded. When Odin (Anthony Hopkins) takes away Thor’s power and casts him out you really feel for both of them. When Loki discovers his origins you can’t help but understand his anger and when he finally fades into a black hole you completely understand Thor’s feeling of loss. Thor: The Dark World didn’t quite live up to the first’s level.

The dialogue just didn’t sound as great as the firsts or the Avengers. Except for the moment Loki transformed into Captain America of course. That was amazing! The action seemed a bit wonky at times and hard to follow. I mean I couldn’t quite tell what happened in the climactic moment where Thor defeats Malekith (Christopher Eccleston). Did he simply stab him? Did he hammer him? Did he stab and then hammer him? Well all of those sounded bad but if you saw the movie you get what I’m saying. That scene would have been a great moment for some slow motion to fully feel the impact of Thor’s final blow. That said I definitely felt the emotion in the film when Thor and Loki’s mother died. That Asgardian funeral was fantastic but it sadly tied the Asgardians of the Marvel Cinematic Universe down to mortality. I would have loved some kind of circular cycle like in the comics and Norse mythology. Ok the ending. I’m ashamed to say I didn’t see it coming.  I loved everything about it and I really can’t wait to find out if Odin has been killed or imprisoned by Loki.

That leads me into the theories section. Did Loki order Lady Sif and Volstagg to deliver the Infinity Gem to the Collector or did they do it to hide it? If they did it to hide it shouldn’t they be running to tell Thor what Loki’s done? Hopefully their motivation is touched upon in the Beta Ray Bill Guardians of the Galaxy, or Thor 3. Speaking of, why did they put the scene where Thor returns to Earth after the credits? I mean people are going to need to know that so they understand that A. he is not in Asgard totally ignorant to the fact that Loki is ruling it and B. know why he is on Earth during the Avengers: Age of Ultron. The Collector scene was the true after credits scene for the film anyway. I Didn’t understand why they put them in the order they did. Ok I know I picked at the film a bit but I really did enjoy just about everything about it. The plot was perfect in my book, even if it didn’t fully delve into the nine realms as much as I wanted. It established a credible threat that only Thor had the means to take on and made Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) a really appealing and interesting female lead for the second time. Oh and let’s not forget the naked antics of Stellen Skarsgard! Lastly both Hemsworth and Hiddleston were amazing. Their chemistry is great and I can’t wait for it to come to a head in the next film. Then we get the Ballad of Beta Ray Bill in Thor 4 right?

Past Comic Book Commentaries
Boycott X-Men: Days of Future Past
Uncanny Venom, Hilarious Captain America
Batman Still the Crown Jewel of the New 52
The Superior Spider-Man
The 1st Comic Book Commentary
Defending Remender and Attacking Racism

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Agents of Shield: The Hub

Agents of Shield: The Hub

J.D. Cook

The newest episode of Agents of Shield was interesting for a couple of reasons. My favorite of which was that Coulson’s (Clark Gregg) story is slowly starting to simmer with progress. I’ve made no secret of my belief that Coulson is in fact a life model decoy that will play into Avengers: Age of Ultron somehow, possibly as Ultron himself or the Vision. In this episode Skye (Chloe Bennet) jokingly said, “It’s like he’s been replaced with a robot version of himself”, in reference to Coulson when he tightened up in the capital building of S.H.I.E.L.D, the Hub. There are a few different moments in the show where more is hinted at and I’m really hoping that plot thread is unraveled by the season’s finale. Skye’s back story was also a central theme in the episode and my friend believes she will be revealed to be Jessica Drew a.k.a. Spider-Woman at some point in the future. I’m not really up on that character but after doing a bit of research it certainly seems like an interesting and extremely feasible possibility.

Now while those were the parts of the episode that really interested me the main plot of it revolved around Fitz (Iain De Caestecker) and Ward (Brett Dalton) in the field being hilarious. This episode was definitely one of the funnier ones to hit the television so far. I did have some minor issues with the episode though. Last week’s episode, F.Z.Z.T., focused on Simmons (Elizabeth Henstridge) and this week on Fitz. It just seemed a bit too formulaic for my taste. I mean those are probably my favorite characters on the show but I think I would have liked a break from their stories to focus in on a slightly different character this week. Melinda May (Ming-Na Wen) hasn’t been featured much of late and I’m wondering why that is. It’s also becoming clearer that Shield is less and less noble and Melinda May might just be a Shield operative in place to keep Coulson in line. Fitz does get major bad ass points in this episode for rigging up a ‘vibration gun’ that blew up enemy weapons. That was mighty cool.

Ok last thoughts before wrapping this up. Coulson has obviously caught on to something as the end of the episode showed him calling about his vacation in Tahiti only to discover he wasn’t cleared to learn of his own recovery. He also didn’t raise the issue with Director Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) yet which means he has lost trust in him or suspects a conspiracy and doesn’t want anyone to know he suspects anything yet. In the comics Fury is pretty notorious for being machiavellian but he’s never downright evil so my guess is Shield has been infiltrated by evil forces which will come into full combat with Captain America in his sequel. I think it would be pretty cool if Agents of Shield ends with Coulson’s team on the run from Shield in a cliffhanger that is resolved when they emerge to help Captain America in The Winter Soldier. Maybe that is just wishful thinking but since Netflix signed a monster deal with Disney giving them exclusive rights to distributing their television programs I’m wondering if Agents of Shield will be anything more than a one season adventure. Only time will tell.

Catch up with the Show on ABC. Com or Hulu!

Other Episodes of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Agents of Shield: Pilot
Agents of Shield: 0-8-4
Agents of Shield: The Asset
Agents of Shield: Eye Spy
Agents of Shield: The Girl in the Flower Dress
Agents of Shield: F.Z.Z.T.

Other Comic Book Related Articles

Boycott X-Men Days of Future Past
Superior Spider-Man
Top 7 Venom Story Arc Countdown
The Avengers Age of Ultron Preview
Batman Vs Superman Preview

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Burn Witch, Burn!

Burn Witch, Burn!

by Peggy Fay Albano

New Orleans 1833:
We are shown here, how very evil Madame Lalaurie really was. She even had her three daughters caged up in her dungeon (for a year) because they were plotting to kill her.

Present Day:
All hell breaks loose! The academy is surrounded by the “walking dead” (or is that a different show?) Fiona discovers Cordelia has had acid thrown in her face. After being told by the doctor that Cordelia will be blind, she freaks out. She takes drugs and liquor and walks into the hospital room of a woman who just had a stillborn baby. Fiona places her hands on the baby and the baby opens its eyes. Makes me wonder, why she can’t restore her daughters sight, or, if not her, why can’t one of the other witches?

Cordelia’s murderous husband comes to visit her and when he takes her hand, she wakes in horror “seeing” him kill the woman he had been with.

In the meantime, the maid sees her undead daughter through the widow. She goes outside to beg her forgiveness for having been such a monstrous mother, but her daughter attacks her. The maid has no other resource but to “kill” her.

Luke confronts the undead. Nan goes out to help him. Marie Leveau (who is levitating at the time, in her own place) causes the undead to attack them. Loe then gets a chainsaw and makes mincemeat out of them. This causes Marie to fall to the floor. She then realizes there’s a powerful witch in the academy.

The Witches Council comes to the academy and demands Fiona to step down from her post of being the supreme. Fiona blames one member of the council, Myrtle (Frances Conroy) for blinding her daughter. She proves this by having them expose her right hand which apparently had been partially eaten by acid. She even had me convinced, but we later discover she had Queenie’s help to pull the deception off. The remaining two members of the council ordered Myrtle to be burned. They all proceeded to the stake to carry out the sentence. After tying Myrtle to the stake, Fiona throws her lit cigarette toward her and she’s engulfed in flames.

Later on, Loe goes to the burned body of Myrtle and awakens her….

Nutshell Reviews7 out of 10 Bigbluebullfrog Leaps

Nutshell Reviews is a collection of very short reviews of the most significant movies, books, music, and video games, from both the present day and days gone passed.

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Agents of Shield: F.Z.Z.T.

Agents of Shield: F.Z.Z.T.

by J.D. Cook

The Agents of Shield dropped by my home state of Pennsylvania last night! Unfortunately it was because a guy’s brain exploded with electricity caused by an alien disease contracted from a Chitauri helmet (the bad alien fodder in the Avengers if you don’t know who they are). Anyway that wasn’t really much of a spoiler because the real juice of the episode lay in the near death of one of the Agents. The overall plot of the story didn’t move forward very much at all but it had more emotional gravitas than any episode thus far. I felt a tad bored as a viewer until the writers flipped the powerful character moments switch to ON. This happened immediately when Coulson (Clark Gregg) refused to leave the side of an infected first responder who was going to die in moments. He attempted to calm him and told the man about his own near death experience stating that he saw something more when he died and it was, ‘beautiful’.

That was just the opening gambit of the episode though as it was Agent Simmons (Elizabeth Henstridge) who was infected with the alien virus. She then spent a good bit of time trying to cure herself with the aid of Fitz (Iain De Caestecker) . The chemistry between the two was amazing in the episode and they should both be given some kind of awards. That said the undisputed best moment of the episode was when Fitz Splitwas going to jump off the plane after Simmons, who was trying to give the team a safe distance from her exploding body, only to have the parachute taken by Ward (Brett Dalton) who leaped out after her without any hesitation after giving a speech to Skye (Chloe Bennet) about waiting to be needed. It was a very cool and amazing moment. I think I’m still recovering from how much my blood pressure rose watching this roller coaster of an episode. I’m just happy the beautiful and amazing Simmons is still on the show and not a victim of Joss Whedon’s murderous ways! Just kidding of course, Whedon has a reputation for killing characters but he’s actually pretty tame when it comes to doing it. This episode did a great job of making me think he might off Simmons even though all my rational story telling predication abilities were telling me it would never happen. So the episode ended on a happy note with Simmons cured and Ward revealing he knows everyone makes fun of him but is actually amused by it.

There were few if any Marvel easter eggs spread throughout the episode and that’s always a bit of a bummer but that wasn’t really the point of the episode. Although Coulson’s blood work was ‘high in iron’ (cough life model decoy cough). My only complaint is that this is the second episode to feature them trapped on their airplane for an extended period. I’m more interested in plots that span different locations and deal with adventure. I’m hoping the mantra for season two is less plane more marvels. Secondly I’m still waiting to see a super power not drive someone insane or be horrible in some way. Oh and why is it reinforced every episode that Coulson is different or that he’s having issues with Shield. I love that story but I want to see some development. He just seems to keep having the same conversations with people about it; this is excluding his great monologue to the first responder which felt very fresh and unique. Agent Blake (Titus Welliver) was a pretty cold antithesis of Coulson though. Fury’s cameo was more funny than serious but Blake seemed to be really threatening Coulson and the moment where he rubbed Lola on his way out drilled home the point that Blake and Coulson could easily be real nemesis down the road a bit. I’m figuring when Coulson realizes Shield isn’t as noble as they seem or when Shield decides to neutralize Coulson.

That’s all for now! See ya next week, hopefully it ties into Thor: the Dark World some how!

Catch up with the Show on ABC. Com or Hulu!

Other Episodes of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Agents of Shield: Pilot
Agents of Shield: 0-8-4
Agents of Shield: The Asset
Agents of Shield: Eye Spy
Agents of Shield: The Girl in the Flower Dress

Other Comic Book Related Articles

Top 7 Venom Story Arc Countdown
The Avengers Age of Ultron Preview
Batman Vs Superman Preview
Comic Book Commentary
God Cell: Gate of the Gods

Articles from Around the Web

 

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